Category: Tax Returns

Division 293 was introduced about five years ago, and is intended to even out the concessional tax treatment that higher income earners enjoy on some superannuation contributions. This results from super contributions made before tax being taxed at 15% within a fund, and the higher relative difference in marginal rates for high income earners compared to the average. (more…)

This non-exhaustive checklist of business deductions is designed to provide an easy reference guide to the types of deductions that might be claimed by businesses. (more…)

This checklist contains a general list of general and specific employment-related deductions and should be used as a guide only. The results may vary depending on individual circumstances. (more…)

In the 2015-16 federal budget, the government increased the small business immediate deductibility threshold from $1,000 to $20,000, which was originally due to end at June 30, 2017. (more…)

In the run up to the end of the FBT year, the ATO reminds employers that a fringe benefit may be provided by another person on behalf of an employer, but may also be provided to another person on behalf of an employee (for example, a relative).

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Putting your money into bricks and mortar has been a traditional stalwart of investing for generations of Australians, and continues to be viewed as a solid place to park spare cash and build wealth in the long term. For many years a lot of us seem to have heeded the quote attributed to Mark Twain: “Buy land, they’re not making it anymore.”  (more…)

Home office expense claims are subject to the same general substantiation requirements as other deductions – that is, records must be kept for five years.

But in practice, full compliance with the substantiation rules may be difficult. It may be simple to keep a receipt for a printer purchased for a home business, but not so easy to prove the deductible proportion of a specific utilities bill. So the ATO has provided some administrative guidelines to ease this burden. (more…)

There are certain behaviours, characteristics and tax issues that the ATO admits will attract its attention.

But as it is more interested to see taxpayers get things right rather than the bother, and expense, of chasing down every misdemeanour, the ATO has spelled out the areas that most concern it — that is, the incidents or details that are more likely to raise a red flag. (more…)

The ATO has a database of “small business benchmarks” against which it compares lodged information. But business owners can also benefit by using the small business benchmarks to compare their own performance. (more…)